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Intimate Partner Violence

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NYS Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-942-6906

In Spanish
1-800-942-6908

Victim Resources

If you are a victim of intimate partner violence seeking information, resources and support, visit:

"Domestic Violence" and "Intimate Partner Violence" are terms that are often used interchangeably. Domestic Violence (DV) can be used to describe any abuse that occurs within the context of one's home or family. OASAS uses the more specific term Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) as defined by the New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence (OPDV):

Intimate Partner Violence is a pattern of coercive tactics, which can include physical, psychological, sexual, economic and emotional abuse, perpetrated by one person against an adult intimate partner, with the goal of establishing and maintaining power and control over the victim.

Intimate Partner includes persons legally married to one another; persons formerly married to one another; persons who have a child in common, regardless of whether such persons are married or have lived together at any time, couples who are in an "intimate relationship" including but not limited to couples who live together or have lived together, or persons who are dating or who have dated in the past, including same sex couples.

Intimate partner violence is not about out of control anger or behavior. Intimate partner violence is about power and control. Although there may be relationships in which intimate partners communicate in ways seem unhealthy, abusive and even violent, if there is not an imbalance of power and an effort by one partner to establish and maintain control over the other, it is not intimate partner violence.

Lesbian, Gay, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) IPV Resources:

Tools that illustrate controlling vs. non-controlling relationships:

Additional IPV Resources: